Fishing in our Estuaries and from our shores

Dec 7, 2016

Please be aware and conscientious about what fish you are catching, whether from a boat or from the shore.

Note that ‘if you are unsure about the status of species of fish you want to purchase, you can send an sms with just the name of the fish to the SASSI FishMs number: 079 499 8795. If the species is on one of the SASSI lists, you will receive information about that species, as well as its associated SASSI colour. Smses are charged at standard rates’. (From the SASSI website)

View the green / orange / red list: http://wwfsassi.co.za/sassi-list/


wwf-sassiSouth African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI)

The unsustainable harvest of the world’s oceans has led to the depletion and, in some cases, collapse of many of the world’s major fish stocks. While the outlook for many threatened marine ecosystems remains bleak in the face of unsustainable fishing practices, those involved in the seafood industry are realising that by changing the way they conduct business now, the long-term viability of their industry can be ensured.

While it may be the responsibility of the government to regulate and monitor fishing activities, it is also the duty of every seafood restaurant, retailer and consumer to support sustainable and responsible fishing practices.

In 2004, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) established the South African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI) to inform and educate all participants in the seafood trade, from wholesalers to restaurateurs through to seafood lovers, about sustainable seafood.
By using a “traffic light” system, the colour-coded SASSI list categorises selected South African and imported seafood species according to their conservation status.

  • Green
    This is the group from which consumers are encouraged to choose, as it contains the most sustainable choices from the healthiest and most well-managed populations. These species can handle current fishing pressure.
  • Orange
    This group includes species that have associated reasons for concern, either because the species is depleted as a result of overfishing and cannot sustain current fishing pressure, or the fishery that catches them may cause particularly severe environmental damage and/or has high bycatch, or the lifestyle of the species makes it vulnerable to high fishing pressure. Consumers are encouraged to think twice and consider the implications of these choices.
  • Red
    This group includes both unsustainable species, which are from collapsed populations or have extreme environmental concerns and/or lack appropriate management, and species that are illegal to buy or sell in South Africa (no-sale species). These species should never be bought by consumers. Fish highlighted in bold in this category are illegal to sell in South Africa.

 

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